Smile ~ it’s Good for You!

Smile ~ it’s Good for You!

Successful
Magnetic
Immune System
Lowers blood pressure
Elevates your mood


June is “National Smile Month”! Did you know that there are many benefits to “smiling”? The acronym above names just a few! A smile is more than just the perimeter of the “pie hole” on our face!

Successful ~ Studies have shown that when we smile regularly we appear to be more confident, are more likely to receive a promotion and that it makes us more approachable. All of these are positive results that we can easily produce in our lives and careers just by smiling! Go ahead, give it a whirl, try putting on a smile at meetings, business appointments, events or even just walking down the street! People might react to you differently!

Magnetic ~ Have you noticed that we are naturally drawn to people that are smiling? Studies have found that there is a real physical attraction factor associated to the gesture of smiling. People want to be around those who have a “smile” on their face. Of course, it is of no surprise, that the frown, grimace and negative facial expressions have the opposite effect.
Your “smile power” can brighten a room, change the atmosphere by putting people at ease and elevate your mood along with the moods of those around you! It is scientifically proven that smiles are contagious! What a powerful thing – a smile.

Immune ~ This is a big one. Smiling can boost your overall health and well-being. The act of smiling helps our immune system to function more effectively. The thought is that when we smile, our immune function improves because we are more relaxed because of the release of endorphins, natural painkillers and serotonin. Together these three neurotransmitters make us feel good from head to toe. During the next cold and flu season, add SMILING to your prevention methods along with washing your hands and taking vitamin C! Bottom line – turn that frown upside down! Our smiles can be considered a natural alternative medicine! Smile and reap the harvest of better overall health!

Lowers blood pressure ~ As we shared above, when we smile…something is happening in our bodies. Studies have shown that “smiling” can create a measurable reduction in our blood pressure. Take the test! If you have a blood pressure monitor at home sit for a few minutes and take a reading. Jot down those numbers. Now put a huge smile on your face and take another reading! Did your numbers drop? Again, this is the power of your smile!

Elevate ~ If you are ever feeling blue try putting on a smile. Did you know that by choosing to smile you can fool your body into thinking you are “happy”? Smiling can trick your brain into elevating your mood because the physical act of smiling activates neural messaging in your brain.

A simple smile can trigger the release of neural communication boosting neuropeptides as well as mood-boosting neurotransmitters like dopamine and serotonin. Smiling is your natural anti-depressant! So, what are you waiting for!? Smile strong ~ smile long ~ elevate your day to a new level!

So, as you can see…. your smile produces many benefits! Sadly, for many, smiling can be embarrassing. Many people hide their smiles because of bad, missing or crooked teeth. Friends, if this is you, there is hope! There are so many affordable options that can help each of us have a beautiful smile.

Having a nice smile isn’t just a cosmetic or egotistical decision. It is a decision that can change your life, influence your health and benefit those around you. At McGlone Dental Care we offer services that can brighten your smile, repair broken or chipped teeth, replace any that are missing and turn your frown upside down! Call us today! Dr. Greg would love to meet with you and discuss the best options for you!

Smoking and Its Effect on Your Oral Health

Quit TOBACCO PRODUCTS. Okay, I know that we are just whistling in the wind on this one…but tobacco, any and all kinds, are not good for your health or your healthy smile. 

Not only does it cause bad breath, gum disease, tooth decay, tartar buildup, tooth loss, gingivitis and teeth discoloration, it can also cause oral cancer.  

Smokers are 6 times more likely to develop these types of cancers: mouth, lip, tongue and throat cancer.

I have attached an article below if you need more information.  McGlone Dental Care would love to help you kick the habit. 

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health#1

TIME TO TOSS

Are you part of the 25% of people that replace their toothbrush every 3 months? Congratulations if you are!!  But if not why not start today!  Go ahead, go to the bathroom, grab that old and familiar faded and frayed bristled brush and TOSS IT OUT!  Okay a little dramatic but really it is important to your Happy & Healthy Smile!

Those frayed bristles can not only damage your gums, but they don’t clean as well as they should.  New bristles are rounded so they do not scrape our gums or the enamel on our teeth.  but as we use our brushes, just from normal wear & tear, the bristle tips wear and become jagged and uneven.  This is when they can begin to scrape and do the damage.   

So, there is potential for damage but obviously they don’t clean as well either.    Grab your brush, take a quick look!  Are your bristles going every direction but straight up?  If so, it is TIME to toss!  Those bent and frayed bristles cannot get between your teeth and up against your gums where all the plaque is thus leaving it behind…doing its dirty work…starting tooth decay and gum disease.

Time for one more reason?  GERMS – BACTERIA – FUNGUS   Now these three words should get your attention and should propel you into action!  Toothbrushes are a breeding ground!  Below we have included a great article about your toothbrush, bacteria and what you can do to win the battle!  Replacing your brush every 3 months is one major step!  With other steps in the interval that can also help keep your brush clean.   

NEWS FLASH – Get a new brush after having the flu, a cold or sore throat!  Don’t re-infect yourself!! Those germs can still be hanging on and around!

Our desire here at McGlone Dental Care encourage you!  It is NEVER to late to start a good dental routine!  It’s a New Year of Happy & Healthy Smiles! Schedule your appointment with us today. We would love to be a part of your journey!

*Information from Colgate.com

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/brushing-and-flossing/ada-03-toothbrush-care

 

New Year’s Resolutions

2019 – THIS is the year that I commit to healthy eating, getting in shape, getting my finances in order and visiting the dentist more than I ever have!

Umm … huh?

At McGlone Dental Care, we know it’s about priorities. That’s why we like to think of dentist visits as Happy Smile Visits!

Not everyone includes dental visits as New Year’s resolutions. But just about everyone includes something about smiling more often, being happier and getting healthier. And we want to help you achieve at least those resolutions!

The folks here at McGlone put together an easy-to-follow guide to the New Year of Happy Smiles!

  1. Get to the dentist … we know, we know. Sounds easy, right? But just like the gym, showing up is the hard part. And we make it easy … just call us! Whether you have insurance or not, we make it affordable and comfortable.
  2. Brush your teeth differently … try it for two minutes, two times a day. We PROMISE your mouth will feel better and so will your smile!
  3. Please. We understand flossing is the probably the most misunderstood and underutilized path to a great smile. But it works … just try it … two times a day. Your teeth will thank you.
  4. Cut back on sugar. Heard that before? Of course you have – but here’s an easy tip to make it easier … simply put less sugar in your coffee. You’ll get used to the difference and it will have amazing effects on your teeth, gums and breath!
  5. Quit tobacco. We would be silly to explain why because you have already heard all the reasons. But we wouldn’t be good at our jobs if we didn’t remind you. Mouth cancer sucks. Really.
  6. Buy new toothbrushes every 90 days. They get old … like tires, spinach and milk. You really will feel the difference.
  7. Toothpastes are different. Some are simply better for your teeth – like some spaghetti sauce is better than others. Some mouthwashes, hairsprays and dental flosses are better than others. Use the good stuff.

Don’t worry … we’ll help you through all this … in the next few weeks, we will address each one of these in more detail! Sounds fun, right!

Trust us. We know. Dental advice can be seen as dull and bland. But it doesn’t have to be, and we want to make sure it’s more than that … it’s YOUR smile, after all.

And we’re serious about helping you making it happy and healthy. We are here for you.

A New Year – Healthy SMILE &  A Better You!

https://www.statisticbrain.com/new-years-resolution-statistics/

 

Keep Your Teeth Healthy this Holiday Season!

teeth healthyIt’s not easy to stay healthy during the holidays. Sweets seem to appear everywhere you go, and with all the present-wrapping and card-writing, there’s not much time to devote to you and your family’s health and well-being. Luckily, Hermey the Elf, best known for his adventures with Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, joined forces with the American Dental Association (ADA) to come up with tips for keeping your mouth and teeth healthy during the holidays. 

In the classic holiday movie, Hermey dreamed of becoming a dentist and helping people keep their teeth healthy. In 2014, the ADA awarded Hermey with a Dental Do Gooder (DDG) for his passion for dentistry. This year, Hermey and the ADA came up with a set of tips to help families keep their smiles in tip-top shape. 

✓ Have a routine. Hermey always brushes his teeth two times a day, for two minutes, and you should too! It’s what keeps your mouth healthy in December and all year long. Make sure to use a fluoride toothpaste that has earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

✓ Choose the carrots. (That means you, Santa!) Cookies and sweets are nice holiday treats, but instead of reaching for another candy cane, take a cue from Rudolph and eat the carrots.

✓ Don’t forget the dentist! The holidays can be a busy time, but that doesn’t mean you can forget about your teeth. If you are due for a teeth cleaning or need work done, don’t forget to visit your dentist in December.

✓ Drink water. You need a lot of energy for holiday activities, but avoid drinking sodas, sports drinks and juices with lots of sugar. Instead, drink water with fluoride in it to keep your teeth strong and healthy.

✓ Protect your teeth. Wear a mouthguard whenever you play sports – or reindeer games – this winter.

If you have dental insurance money left in your plan, call us to get in before the end of the year to keep your teeth healthy. We’d love to help you maximize your benefits this year and for years to come!  Happy Holidays from the team at McGlone Dental Care!

*Information provided by the American Dental Association (ADA)

 

Dental Benefits

Do you have money left on your annual Dental Insurance Plan? Have you checked it lately? If not, you can check, or you can have us check for you. Most insurance plans are run on a calendar year and if you don’t use all your benefit by the end of the calendar year, you will lose those funds.

So, what does that mean for you? It means, it’s a great time to maximize your benefits and make sure that you use your yearly maximum amount allowed according to your plan. If whatever dental work you need to have done is completed before 12/31/18 and billed on or before that date, that work will be applied to this year’s maximum amount that is allowed according to your plan. *Most insurance plans cover 2 cleanings per year and cover 100% of any preventative work. You should make sure that you get the full value out of the benefits that you work hard and pay for.

We have openings in our schedule for the rest of the year and will be open the week of Christmas. If you have dental work that you need to have done or just want to have your teeth cleaned before the end of the year, give us a call. We will do our best to make sure that your insurance coverage is maximized for you and you are able to get the full amount of your plan for the year.

Call for an appointment today before we are all booked up through the end of the year.


*Most plans but not all plans cover 100% of diagnostic and preventative dental care. It’s the patient’s responsibility to know what percentage their dental plan covers.

Fall Back and Recharge!

Self-care is so important and as we embark on fall with shorter, brisker and drier days, it’s a great time to come in and get recharged.  If you’ve neglected your self-care routine because you’ve been so busy this summer, now is the perfect time to get your self-care routine back in shape. Let Skin Is In help you make yourself a priority again!

Skin Care Tips for Fall

The end of summer here and we have officially started Fall.  This means it’s time to switch up your Sanitas skin care routine for fall. The change in seasons can wreak havoc on your complexion, leaving it feeling dull, dry and dehydrated. Keeping your skin refreshed and replenished is the key to extending your summer glow through the fall season.

The Best Skin Care Routine for the Fall Season

To ease the transition from summer to fall, we’ve taken the guesswork out of choosing your autumn essentials. Here are our recommendations for your fall skin care routine, chosen from a selection of Sanitas Skin Care products hand-picked to revive and replenish your skin all season long.  

Step 1: Cleanse

Wash away impurities, slough off surface debris and tighten your skin’s appearance with Sanitas Lemon Cream Scrub Exfoliating Cleanser. This multi-action exfoliating cleanser is infused with natural fruit extracts and Vitamin C to gently remove dead skin cells.

Step 2: Mask

Embrace the changing seasons with two limited edition Sanitas masks inspired by autumnal ingredients. Replenish your skin’s moisture and fight the visible signs of aging with a natural pumpkin enzyme, vitamins A, B & C in Sanitas‘ Pumpkin Enzyme mask. Sanitas‘ Cranberry Lactic mask is loaded with natural sources of Vitamin C, lactic acid and AHAs to revitalize your skin’s appearance and enhance your natural glow.

Step 3: Tone

Energize your complexion with Sanitas‘ Moisture Mist. This moisture mist provided extra hydration and promotes the look of elasticity. Skin appears mattified, refreshed and perfectly radiant.

Step 4: Treat

Treat your skin to a firming serum followed by an eye and lip volume add on. It will reduce the appearance of fine lines around your eyes and lips and plump your lips for a more voluminous smile this fall.

 

Step 5: Moisturize

Finish your fall skin care routine with Sanitas PeptiDerm Moisturizing Cream.  A synergistic blend of age arresting peptides.  

We hope you enjoyed these fall skin care tips! Are you excited for autumn? While we’re sad to see summer go, we must admit we’re looking forward to autumn leaves, Pumpkin Spice Lattes and cozy cable knits. Tell us what you love about fall on Facebook.

Sanitas products are for sale at Skin is In, which is located inside of McGlone Dental Care.  If we don’t have what you need, we can order whatever you’d like for your home care regime.  Just let Meg know when you call to schedule your fall facial with her.  She’ll be happy to place an order for you.  

Combining a Fall Facial with your next dental appointment will ease your anxiety and you will leave your dental appointment feeling more relaxed than you have in a long time.

Fall Dental Tips for You and Your Family

McGlone Dental CareSummer is coming to an end (regrettably). The days are getting shorter, cooler and we’re looking forward to all things pumpkin!

For you to maintain optimum oral health in the coming cooler months, we thought we’d give you a few fall-friendly oral health tips that will hopefully help you plan your oral health care for this fall and winter with ease.

1. Cooler weather could indicate teeth issues

Do you suffer from sensitive teeth when it starts to get cooler out?  Many people do.  This could be your body’s way of signaling that there may be damage to your teeth or gums.  Cold sensitivity could mean several things including; gum shrinkage, thin enamel or tooth bruising, or cracked teeth.  If you are experiencing sensitive teeth this fall for more than three days, please call our office so that we can evaluate the problem and give you relief.

2. Halloween is coming! Manage your children’s candy consumption

Your children probably look forward to Halloween all year, but it’s important that you manage how much candy they consume from their trick or treating outings so that the candy they eat now doesn’t damage their teeth for the long haul.  One tip to help you manage this is to only allow them to have candy at meal times.  The saliva they produce after eating at meal times will help rinse the mouth and alleviate the mouth of any cavity-causing bacteria.

3. Schedule your end of year appointments now!

If your insurance allows you to have two exams and two cleanings per year, go ahead and schedule your last exam/cleaning appointment for the end of the year.  We can look up when the last time you were in and make sure that we schedule your next cleaning in conjunction with what your insurance will pay for.  Life gets super busy as it gets closer to the end of the year, so take a few minutes now to call us and let us help you get your cleaning appointments for you and your family pre-scheduled. It will be one less thing you have to think about as the year nears its end.

We hope these tips will help you have a fun fall and enjoy all of your kid’s Halloween treats in moderation. 

Start the school year with a smile: 3 back-to-school tips

It’s the start of a new school year, and your kids are set with new clothes and school supplies. But don’t forget about oral health! Add these dental health tips to your back-to-school checklist.

  1. Take your kids to the dentist

Start the school year right with a dental cleaning and exam. Ask your child’s dentist about sealants and fluoride treatments to prevent decay. These treatments are easy ways to stop cavities before they start. And they can even improve your child’s performance at school. A third of children miss school because of oral health problems, according to Delta Dental’s 2015 Children’s Oral Health Survey.

  1. Pick the right snacks

Swap out lunchbox no-no’s with healthy alternatives. Instead of chips or crackers, try nuts. Salty snacks may seem healthy because they don’t contain sugar, but simple starches can be just as bad. These snacks break down into a sticky goo, coating teeth and promoting decay. Avoid candies and granola bars, offering crunchy snacks like celery sticks, baby carrots, and cubes of cheddar cheese.

  1. Make brushing and flossing fun

To keep their mouths healthy, kids need to brush twice a day for two minutes at a time. They should also floss every day, preferably after dinner. Try these tricks to make oral hygiene more exciting:

  • Use a sticker calendar. Let your kids place stickers on each day to represent brushing and flossing.
  • Play music. Collect your kids’ favorite two-minute songs and make sure they brush the whole time.
  • Help your child pick a themed toothbrush in his or her favorite color.
  • Provide a kid-friendly floss holder. These Y-shaped devices make flossing more comfortable.

Source:  https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/back-to-school-tips.html

Home Oral Care

Key Points

  • Home oral care recommendations from the ADA are based on data from clinical studies.
  • While general recommendations may adequately address the needs for many patients, a dentist may tailor home oral care recommendations to fit the individual patient’s needs and wants.
  • Home oral care is an important contributor to oral health and can help lessen the need for extensive dental intervention in the future.

Introduction

Spending the right amount of time engaged in appropriate home oral care is undoubtedly essential to helping minimize the risk of caries and periodontal disease.  An individual who visits the dentist twice a year for an oral exam and dental prophylaxis will spend approximately two hours per year in the dental chair.  The time for that same person to brush and clean between his or her teeth each day might be estimated to be around 30 hours per year.  Considering the amount of time that should be devoted to daily oral hygiene, it is important to understand the scientific evidence that supports home oral care recommendations made to patients.

In 2017, the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs identified three aspects of home oral care that dentists should discuss with their patients:

  1. General recommendations that are applicable to most people;
  2. Personalized recommendations specifically targeted to meet the needs of the individual patient, especially patients at increased risk of caries and/or gingivitis; and 
  3. Lifestyle considerations to enhance oral health and wellness.

The general and personalized recommendations were developed in accordance with a rapid evidence assessment methodology,1 meaning that the evidence examined was derived from existing systematic reviews.  Lifestyle considerations comport with current ADA policy.  This Oral Health Topic page is an executive summary of that work and relevant ADA policy.

General Recommendations for the Prevention of Caries and Gingivitis

1) Brush your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste

While a seemingly simple statement, the guidance for brushing twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste weaves together a number of discrete components.

Toothbrushing frequency
Review of the scientific literature, along with guidance from governmental organizations and professional associations found sufficient evidence to support the contention that twice-daily brushing, when compared with lower frequencies, was optimal for reducing risk of caries,2-4 gingival recession or periodontitis.5-7  It is important to recognize that in these studies, it was the frequency of tooth-brushing with a fluoride toothpaste that was evaluated rather than tooth-brushing alone.

Fluoride toothpaste
Although the measures used to assess the benefit varied, studies examining the effect of over-the-counter (OTC) fluoride dentifrice on caries incidence in children and adolescents found the fraction of caries prevented ranged from 16% per tooth to 31% per surface versus placebo or no dentifrice, and concluded that fluoride-containing toothpaste was effective in caries control.4, 8, 9  In addition, high level evidence shows that 5,000 ppm fluoride (available with a prescription) results in significantly more arrest of root caries lesions than use of OTC levels of fluoride (1,000 – 1,500ppm).10

Toothbrushing duration
Data examining the question of optimal duration of daily tooth-brushing encounters relies on plaque indices which are surrogate measures rather than direct measure of caries or gingivitis.  Understanding that the use of surrogate measures decreases the certainty with which a recommendation can be made, the available systematic reviews found a brushing duration of two minutes was associated with bigger reduction in plaque than brushing for a single minute.11, 12  Two minutes per whole mouth can also be expressed as thirty seconds per quadrant or about four seconds per tooth.

2) Clean between your teeth daily

While cleaning between teeth is important to maintaining oral health, it is a concept that must overcome several barriers to adoption. ” Flossing” is often used as a shorthand, common term for interdental cleaning, which can become problematic in the real world where many report a strong distaste for that activity.13 Some people presume flossing as ineffective or unnecessary, which can also make it harder for them to adopt the daily habit. Flossing is a technique-sensitive intervention14 as exemplified by the disparity in benefit observed when comparing study designs involving self-flossing and professional flossing.15 Where patients do not see positive results from flossing, they may not continue to do so.

Using flossing as shorthand for interdental cleaning can also be problematic in that patients may be unaware of alternative devices that may be more pleasant or effective for them. A meta-review, which included the available devices developed for this purpose (i.e. dental floss, interdental brushes, oral irrigators, and wood sticks), addressed the question “What is the effect of mechanical inter-dental plaque removal in addition to tooth brushing on managing gingivitis in adults?”  The strength of the evidence on the benefit ranged from weak to moderate depending on the device in question.16

Thus, there may not be one “best” interdental cleaning method; rather, the best method for any given patient may be one in which they will regularly perform. A guiding principle which is relevant to  interdental cleaning is: “best care for each patient rests neither in clinician judgment nor scientific evidence but rather in the art of combining the two through interaction with the patient to find the best option for each individual.”17

3) Eat a healthy diet that limits sugary beverages and snacks

While eating a healthy diet is important for overall health and well-being, a review of the literature found little in terms of the effects of micronutrients on the risk of caries or periodontal disease.  However, the conclusion of numerous systematic reviews on the effect of the macronutrient content of the diet, specifically of sugar, is that there is an association between sugar intake and caries.18-20  A review of the evidence supporting nine international guidelines recommending decreased consumption of sugar found consistent recommendations from all the groups while noting that they relied on different data and rationales.18

4) See your dentist regularly for prevention and treatment of oral disease

Viewed through the prism of the primary prevention of caries and/or gingivitis, a systematic review of the literature failed to arrive at consensus regarding optimal recall frequency to minimize either caries21, 22 or periodontal disease risk23 in part due to limited availability of studies addressing this topic.  Nonetheless, in terms of the balance between resource allocation and risk reduction, it can be concluded that there is merit in tailoring a patient’s recall interval to individual need based on assessed risk of disease.21, 24

Previously, the ADA Healthy Smile Tips advised people to “Visit your dentist regularly.”  However, dentists are doctors of oral health, which encompasses both the prevention and treatment of oral disease.  The current recommendation goes a step further than its predecessor in articulating the duality of the dental visits.  Dental care includes actions to reduce disease risk, as well as the formulation and execution of a treatment plan when disease is present.

Personalized Recommendations for the Prevention of Caries and Gingivitis

While generalized recommendations for home oral care may be appropriate to help optimize oral wellness for many patients, those found to be at elevated risk of caries and/or gingivitis, may ask their dentists to provide guidance on additional action steps that they can take to reduce their risk of oral disease.25  To help address this reality, the Council on Scientific Affairs recommends that dentists: 

  • Design a home care regimen with specific recommendations for oral hygiene. This may involve consideration of not only the person’s individual oral disease risk, but the needs and wants of the patient.
  • Offer direction concerning lifestyle changes.  This is addressed in the next section, entitled “Lifestyle Considerations.”  
  • Provide guidance on dental products and mechanical devices. This includes detailed suggestions that can help patients make decisions about dental hygiene practices and products.  Patients may look to their dentists for guidance and recommendations to help discern among the plethora of home oral care products and mechanical devices that lay claim to oral health benefit.  Dentists and patients can look to the ADA Seal of Acceptance program as a source of validated information regarding the safety and efficacy of many home oral care products.

After careful review of the available evidence, the Council on Scientific Affairs provides the following rationale to inform decision-making between dentists and patients on products and mechanical devices that can be considered as adjunct therapies and modalities for the prevention of caries and/or gingivitis:

1) Antimicrobials
For individuals with increased risk for gingivitis or periodontal disease, there is evidence that over-the-counter oral care products containing specific antimicrobial active ingredients can decrease risk of gingivitis.  Systematic reviews found that mouth rinses containing an antimicrobial effective amount of essential oil(s) (with or without alcohol) or cetylpyrdinium chloride,26-28 and toothpastes containing triclosan or stannous fluoride,29-31 were associated with decreased risk of supragingival plaque and gingivitis.

2) Fluoride Mouth rinses
With regards to caries risk reduction, there is strong evidence supporting the use of fluoride-containing mouth rinses by children at elevated caries risk;32 and low level evidence on the benefit of adults using fluoride mouth rinse to decrease their risk of root caries.10

3) Power Toothbrushes
Powered toothbrushes provide effective removal of dental plaque and reduction in gingival inflammation.11, 33 Though there may be statistically significant improvement in dental plaque removal or gingival inflammation when comparing use of a powered toothbrush with a manual toothbrush, the difference may not be clinically meaningful.33 However, when brushing technique is a concern such as for patients with special needs, those who require the help of a caregiver for activities of daily living, or those with manual dexterity deficit, the use of a powered toothbrush has been found to provide substantive benefit in plaque reduction.34-38

4) Interdental Cleaning Devices
Recent analysis using NHANES data found that adults who more frequently reported using floss or other devices to clean between their teeth were found less likely to have periodontitis.39  Because of the barriers to interdental cleaning, it may not be effective to tell patients that they must floss and expect it to become a regular part of their oral home care routine. Instead, dentists can support effective home oral care by gauging their patient’s level of understanding, learning about their motivation, and then serving as a “coach” by communicating and promoting daily cleaning between their teeth.40 Discussing the various interdental cleaning devices can help educate patients on available options and provide them with some of the skills necessary to be effective stewards of their own oral health.

Lifestyle Considerations for the Prevention of Caries and Gingivitis

Dentists can provide, promote or direct patients to information about lifestyle behaviors and/or services that can aid in reducing their risk.

Beyond the general and personalized recommendations above, there are three specific ADA policies regarding aspects that fall under the rubric of lifestyle considerations with roles to help prevent caries and gingivitis:

1) Consumption of Fluoridated Water
Much of the literature evaluated in systematic reviews examining the association between consumption of fluoridated water and reduced levels of caries in primary and permanent dentition derives from studies conducted before the 1980’s.41  One experiment, in which a Canadian community discontinued its community water fluoridation to allow for the comparison of caries rates within a socioeconomically similar, adjacent community which maintained its water fluoridation demonstrated a significant increase in primary tooth decay and an increasing trend for increased decay in permanent dentition 2.5 – 3 years post cessation among residents who reported usually drinking tap water.42  In 2016, the U.S. Surgeon General expressed the view that community water fluoridation was an important component for developing a culture of disease prevention and helping to ensure health equity for all.43

2) Use of Tobacco Products
While the various forms of tobacco have a variety of health consequences, the oral consequences of cigarette smoking44 and smokeless tobacco products45 can include adverse effects on gingival health, enamel discoloration and erosion, and oral cancer.  For these reasons, the ADA has long advocated for smoking and tobacco cessation initiatives both at the policy and practice levels.

3) Oral Piercings
The literature on the oral consequences of oral piercings show tooth fracture, tooth wear and gingival recession among the commonly reported adverse events,46 and the ADA established policy discouraging oral piercing in 1998.

This information was prepared & provided by the ADA Science Institute’s Center for Scientific Information. The ADA Council on Scientific Affairs reviewed and approved the content of this page.

Last Updated: January 18, 2018